Finding Dandelion by Lex Martin

Finding Dandelion (Dearest, #2) - Lex Martin

Tropes: 24

“See, there are happily ever afters. Even for assholes like me.”


This quote sums up the entire book. Because, even after everything, the hero is still an asshole.

Finding Dandelion is the second book in the Dearest series, and this time the story focuses on Jax, the heroine from the first book's brother, and Dani, one of the roommates (of the previous heroine's). The second book, much like the first, falls due to its lack of character development and a lack of plot.

Jax meets Dani at a party, unaware that Dani is his sister's new roommate, and Dani is unaware that Jax is her new roommate's brother. Dani, feeling betrayed after her recent breakup decides she's willing to hook up with someone. They see each other at the party and are drawn to each other. When Dani uses Jax to avoid confrotnatoin with her ex, they make out and it soon turns into more. They are interrupted before they go "all the way", and the next time Dani meets Jax, he seems to have no memory of them ever meeting. After hearing Clem, Jax's sister, comment on the girls Jax usually hooks up with, Dani is horrified and doesn't want to be "one of those girls", and says nothing to Jax or Clem. But Jax is attracted to Dani, is intrugied by her, and simply can't get her out of his head. And so their story begin.

Just like the first book, there is basically no plot. It's all focused on how Jax is in constant heat and wants Dani. The other part of the time (Dani's POV) is all about not wanting to be "one of those girls", of still wanting Jax, and not being sure why Jax doesn't appear to remember their night together. It doesn't help that for the first 30% of the book, the author, for some reason, felt the need to rehash part of the first book, with no alteration (apart from being in Jax's and Dani's heads). It adds absolutely nothing to the plot, if anything, it's confusing to the overall story. What did it matter? Why did it matter? It didn't. The story should've started somewhere around the 30% mark, and not sooner. (Of course, the initial meeting could've been there, but it could've replaced the utterly useless prologue this book does have.)

Back to the characters: here's how remembarable they are. I had to look up Dani's name (even though it's hinted at in the title). I had to go through all my updates (and notes) to remember her personality (which she has none). I couldn't even remember what the "big misunderstanding" was. I couldn't remember the part with her mother (which, honestly, is more due to the writing being unable to provoke a single emotion). What my updates (and notes) reminded me was that Dani is a hypocrite. She's sexist. She looks down on women who engages in causal sex.

The girl who grew up watching old Madonna videos wants to embrace my sexual freedom and treat last night cavalierly, but the small part of me who someday wants the house, kids and white picket fence knows what I did last night is not how I’ll achieve those ends.


She's catty. She's jealous. She shames the women who so much as looks at Jax. Of course, she herself is virginal, but the of course changes when she get's a taste of the hero's junk.

That would be the alien who took over my body and turned me into a sex-craved maniac.


Though, even if Dani had been a memorable character, had some personality, the love interest alone is able to drag this book down to one star.

I think if I fuck her, I’ll somehow tarnish her. Because that’s all this’ll be, sex in a dark club, and she’s not the kind of girl I want to use and abuse for one night.


He's lovely, isn't he? Jax is a sexist, misogynist asshole. He admits himself that he's an asshole. He has zero character development. He sexist in the beginning, he's sexist in the end. He shames women in the beginning, he shames them at the end. In his world, there are two types of women: women for sex, and women to marry (kinda).

She’s pretty in a been-there-done-that sort of way.


Women are to use for a man's pleasure. Because girls should learn to please a man in school, whether they want to or not.

Not every girl is good at giving head, but it’s something that should be taught in school along with making pancakes.


The worst part is that there is no reason for Jax to see women this way. Sure, his mother was absent, but he had a sister who was nothing like her mother. He had onegirlfriend in the past who treated him badly. Still, it does not excuse why he'd grow up to view women this way. So, basically, he's just an asshole for no reason. The fact that he uses abuse (see quote above) when thinking about sex says a lot about his view on women (and sex). And, as said, Jax is never called out on it, and he has the same personality throughout the book. Of course, Dani is the exception, the special snowflake that can tame this beast.

Just like in the first book, the friends are not friends. For one thing, we have Jenna (from the first book) spilling secrets all over the place without telling her supposedly best friend. She spills the secret to (practically) a stranger. We have Travis, the stereotypical gay best friend, whose purpose is to push Dani to meet guys.

Basically, this book suffers the same issues the first on did: poor character development, weak plot, sexism, and shaming. The first book I said that the writing was good, decent. In this, there's no emotion provoked by the writing, it's repetitive, and at times awkward.